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20121112
20121120
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
evangelical women this time? >> again, i think there was always the question of religion and no one wanted to state the obvious which is governor romney's religion being mormon and whether that would impact the vote and it seemed it did impact the vote this time. it's very unfortunate because i think, at the end, what we need in america would have been a president that could push our economy forward and do what we need to do do get out of the economic crisis we have been in. you know, really, it's unfortunate when 2 million less people voted this time. >> even in the swing state of virginia, you had less evangelicals come out as they did for mccain in 2008. 6% to 8% stayed at home. >> you would hope we could cross the race and religion barrier. >> but let me ask you this -- granted, i thought the republican field from the beginning was incredibly weak. >> absolutely. >> but i saw republicans, once romney got the nomination, partisans gathering around him and saying, oh, the mormon issue isn't going to matter. and it did matter. there are evangelicals who see mormons as a sect and not chris
there was such a little god, jesus, religion and was all political and was all paranoid. they're coming to get us and we have to get ready. i'm not sure that i observed the insight that it gave me but it sure made me understand more about the fear that is out there and often behind the vitriol that we experience and i often, you know when someone comes at me either directly or indirectly the way that i try to stay sympathetic to ask what are they afraid of and is their anything i can say that convinces them that there is no need to be afraid but this was a double dose and it really shook me and helped me understand a little bit better of what we were against. many of our enemies in this movement are in the business of ratcheting up people's anxiety often to make money or to work for a particular political party or candidate or for whatever reason, it seems to me that they are simply brilliant at ratcheting up the anxiety. this service was not anything about the comfort that comes from a loving god, it was all about what is going to happen and it ain't going to be pretty. so get ready. i think we need to
facing the jewish community, from religion and culture to politics and business. >> it's been a dream of ours to have the kind of gathering to show off for baltimore and also to engage with our friends and colleagues from around the country. >> once a year time when everybody gets a chance to sit together and sit, not just listen, but to talk with one another and what's going on positive in communities, but also how people are struggling and how they can learn from other communities. >> with israel to mark its 65th birthday next year, there is a lot on the table for this gathering, finding a temporary home in baltimore, which serves as a base for one the strongest jewish communities in the u.s. >> and next month governor o'malley will travel to israel for the third time. this time he says he's taking his son. >> now, your 11 that weather plus forecast with meteorology john collins. >> really nice today. didn't make it to 70 degrees, but very, very nice. cold front coming out to the west. that's responsible for the nice conditions we've had, because the southerly flow ahead of that fro
religion in the u.s. the national religion in the u.s. is the military and the journalists are the high priests. >> what does this mean for afghanistan and the cia? you have this military general becoming the head of the cia, now david petraeus -- the have whatever will happen to john allen. what does this mean? >> i'm not sure means anything as far as the policy national security state. i think it will simply be replaced. i'm not sure that general allen is going anywhere. certainly, david petraeus was an important person in the sense he was a revered, almost as a religious figure, that he shielded the cia and other military institutions from any kind of criticism i think -- >> and has been pushing for an expansion of the drone war. >> and president obama, the commander in chief, his boss, is very much on board with the expansion not just of the drone war, the conversion of the cia and to even more of a paramilitary organization than it has ever been before. i think that will continue fully apace on whoever steps and will be fully on board with that. >> can you say a little bit about th
religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the contraceptive comments are so outrageous over the past year, we think of it as a republican blood of stupidity. in fact, one of the interesting things is that it was prompted by unusual behavior on the part of the democrats. the democrats, while being the party of women, and about the time -- as soon as they started counting the gender gap, which really wasn't
their religion trumps their commitment to journalism. that's atrocious and beneath rupert murdoch. >>> it is now clear luke russert has some of his brass. when nancy pelosi said she was staying on as minority leader, he asked a question related to her age and she didn't like it one bit. >> some of your colleagues privately say your decision to stay on prohibits the party from having a younger leadership and will be hurt the party long term. what's your response. >> you always ask that question, except to mitch mcconnell. i think what you will see, and let's for a moment honor it as a legitimate question, although it's quite offensive. >> i'm sorry, congresswoman, it was a legitimate question and russert asked it respectfully. >>> speaking of questions, president obama was wrapping up his white house news conference when bloomberg tried to send it into overtime. >> thank you very much. >> most of the conversations -- >> that was a great question, but it would be a horrible precedent for me to answer your question just because you yelled it out. so thank you very much, guys. >> nice try, but obama
religion. >> hmm. general james "spider" marks joining us this morning. thank you, sir. we certainly appreciate it. nice to see you. >> sure. >> still ahead this morning on "starting point" when veterans return home they often face an uphill battle trying to return to civilian life but there's a method of meditation that could help them. we're dealing with post traumatic stress. russell simmons is our guest up next. ♪ 100% greek. 100% mmm... ♪ oh wow, that is mmm... ♪ in fact it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. well ok then, new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. ♪ it is so good. alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galax
a lot about religion but one milestone was overlooked. hawaii made tulsi gabbard the first hindu congresswoman. representative elect gabbard joins us now from new york. good morning. >> thank you for having me this morning. >> we're excited to have you here. how does it feel? >> thank you so much. i'm excited and ready to get to work. >> you have a lot of work to do, too, let me tell you. >> yes. >> but let's talk about your religion because, you know, a lot of us think that it's pretty cool to have a hindu in congress for the first time. do you feel like you're something unusual? >> you know, i'm actually very proud and i'm proud especially of the people of hawaii and to come from a place as special as hawaii because not only did they make the choice to elect me, the first hindu member of congress, but also elected the first buddhist member of the u.s. senate. and in hawaii, hindu and buddhists are a majority in faith within the community but it shows the respect, diversity, and love and aloha that people have in hawaii to allow for something like this to happen. >> normally we
with our long history and pluralization of american religions. >> so tell us a bit about that history. why is it okay to joke about jesus but not other religious figures? >> the sacred is much more in contest here in part because of our legacy of religious freedom, but in part because we've had a long history of conflict over sacred imagery and words, often violent conflict. and in more recent years because of the rise of secularism, because of the rise of the culture of mockery in part, as well. it's just become more acceptable. >> is it because more and more of us are agnostic? i mean, why is it? is it -- do we still believe in jesus yet we joke about him? is it the other way around? >> well, it's funny if you read the comments on our cnn belief blog, you'll see that people are engaging in arguments with each other saying our argument has but humor is the way we deal with these kinds of conflicts. and as we say in the piece, in part, it's our way we don't kill each other. >> well, interestingly, i was talking to one of the employees here at cnn, kathy, and she said her minister, she belo
everything they taught me as far as religion and jesus christ, but i was interbreeding and likes to read and started getting into history and discovered that a lot of real history could not reconcile with what was in the bible. the question is, i discovered a series of books that mention, suggest perhaps that there really was no jesus christ. the historical records actually start almost two centuries after this character appeared, and it could possibly be something that was -- i mean, an invention, but have you addressed the fact that for 200 years so before there was writing about this, nothing appears, no letters from anybody, no graffiti, no correspondence between ancient peoples about this cheeses character. have you ever looked into this? why is everybody always take for granted that there is a jesus character, let alone the fact that he was a god or some other got? >> guest: i appreciate, sir. i will tell you this. these -- are there some things that are in my room and some that are out? i will tell you, we will look at any theory sometimes that are out there, but whenever you want
and really not about race or religion, and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at ours. >> i am with one of the sponsors, northrop grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria. when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i do not see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle east, something like 20% to 30%. ok. my figures are dated. anyway, i am curious why this is not discussed, and if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out -- thank you. >> i mean, i do not think we are hearing a lot right now about the differences between the moslems and christians, because that is not a pressing problem in syria, and getting back to a comment earlier about it spilling over into the rest of the region, -- they are now all in turkey, try to help the turks get assad out. getting him out with goes a long way to add least getting some other resources -- getting him out would go a long way to at least getting some other resources redirected.
discussion of the impact of very strongly developing fundamental movements in the world religions, particularly monotheistic religions, impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as perhaps creating a certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment of the impact of fundamentalist religious movements, particularly in the context of what is going to be a new normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> i think what is so interesting about this discussion is the baseline question, just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america and american power and leadership. how powerful did america look in 1979 up to vietnam? not very. how powerful did america look in 1989, 10 years later? extremely powerful. 1999, in vincible. 2009-now? well, we have settled down, but we do not really know what we have settled down into. i think it is a baseline question, and i think we forget how quickly the perception of the strings -- strength of american leadership can be. what i think is the question a
's religion, that they look into the psychological record, that they looking to his medical records, makes the case for punishing the student or kicking them out. hayden was a little bit upset that he got such a bad dressing down by the president, and so in protest he made a collage. he made a collage that he put on facebook that included asthma puffer, no blood for oil, crushed earth, you know, all the consequences he thought would happen with this parking garage. and he calls it is safe, the environmentalist group that he thought was falling down on the job, zachariah memorial parking garage. the joke being that this president thought this is going to be part of his legacy, his memorial. the university, as i said, zachariah was already looking for an excuse to kk out of school. he slips a note on the university slips a note under hayden's door claiming that this proved, the collage attached to them this proved that hayden was not a clear and present danger to campus. the collage stapled to the note, and if anybody really wants to take us who say they thought the student was a threat, gai
. the menorah and hanukkah display. but santa monica said pox on all of your houses and religion goes out out of the windo and we'll not allow the first amendment and as a result in the public square, christian and jewish symbols will not be allowed to be display in santa monica. they will go to court to stop it and the war on christmas has begun. we'll watch this case closely. it is an important one. people want to see. >> steve: it is and too bad that the tradition. >> it was a wonderful thing to see and disappointing that it is going by the boards. >> steve: thank you for joining us. enjoy your thanksgiving. >> thank you. >> steve: straight ahead, the statute was posed to honor pope john ii, why did it look more like mussolina. he's suing his brother's groomsman. those stories straight ahead. come on, guys. ♪ ♪ great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more pcessed flakes look nothing like natural grains. i'm eating what i kn is better nutrition. mmmm. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than
a fighter squadron where a previous commander we had i think three or four folks of the mormon religion in the squadron. they didn't drink. they would come to happy hour on fridays at the bar when we used to do that kind of thing. and they'd participate and drink a soda and didn't drink. and he held this against them for some reason. he got fired and i became the leader. not for that but for some other stupid stuff. let me tell you how easy it was to take over that squadron. all you have to do is embrace everybody. and if you don't in a squadron, if you exclude three people not only do they not people part of the team but you're not going to get the job done. our military is not going to get any bigger by the way through most of your careers. we need everybody in a major way. so i think it's also good by the way that you're in the military or going to join the military for those at the service academies and v.m.i. and probably some others in this room. you're joining an organization that has no tolerance for discrimination. and it's been going on for a long time. it's taken a long time
, not to judge people by their religion, skin color, financial status or anything like that, but accept them for who they are because i have to tell you i am guilty of having what i said call small town complex. using your world is only this big because that is how you were taught. i am 24 and that is not the case. we always do that. we are so fast to judge one another without getting to know one another. i definitely think it is something we could listen to. in northeastern afghanistan, right on the back -- pakistan border, this is who i would be stationed with. lt. johnson and dr. lee in. stock way was that navy corpsman but as anybody knows anything about navy corpsman they might as well the marines. i will call him a marine from here on out. [applause] >> part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and develop the team because this was a group of guys i call my brothers. when the team was put together the brass picks different skill sets, ranks, throw them in a team, they don't ask about personality or anything like that. they just put you in and expect him to get along. when i
think that people have a right to not practice religion here. they have a right to do things the way they feel comfortable doing it, which is called secular or religious thinking. they have the right in this country not to follow religious law. for him to feel that he needed to resign over a scandal, i do not think that is proper when he does not have to follow religious thinking about sex in this country. host: thank you for the call this morning. here is the editorial from "usa today." host: diane, want to get your thoughts this morning on the democratic line. caller: i went to school with one of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we
their television show. he's very interested in religion, he's very interested in faith, and even though he did not remain a mormon for his entire life -- it was just as a child, he returned to the catholic church -- it will always be a part of this sort of complex faith journey, as he calls it. religion's complicated, and his religious story is complicated too. not because of just catholicism and mormonism, but also because he had joined a protestant/evangelical church that his wife and her family participated in. so he's dabbled with a lot of religious practices. >> host: does he attend church today, and if so, where? >> guest: he says that when he's in washington, he attends catholic mass every single day when he can. >> host: do you know which? ing the yeah, there's a catholic church just a few steps away from his office on capitol hill. it's very easy to get to for him. but when he's here in miami, he lives in west miami, a suburb of miami proper. he attends another church called christ fellowship, and that is an evangelical/protestant-based faith which is a part of the southern baptist co
york. >> john: it was terrible. it is not a popular believe but my religion teaches me that hurricanes are god's punishment for pat robertson. and we had kind of a weird experience. i lived in greenwich village my whole life. i just moved uptown. i have a baby and i can't live in my shoe box anymore. my place is very, very small. the anne frank family was like "can we see something else"? we moved uptown and thought we had dodged the hurricane because we didn't lose power. i had all of the upper westside guilt. it was amazing because all of manhattan, they closed off all of the bridges and tunnels. manhattan was isolated from the rest of america which is how people of manhattan already view themselves. then i had a flood in my place downtown after the hurricane and then my storage unit was flooded with four feets of hudson river sewage water. >> oh! >> john: i would like to invite all of you climate change deniers to come and help me get the sewage smell out of my winter clothes because man there was som
can behe voter who moved into the democratic, but looking at the number of factors, religion, consumer purchases. how did we get them to be a democrat? continuing use of the social media. we still cannot long-term affects of that. one thing that tickels me is -- tickles me is the style of obama. in two weeks somebody knocked and said you are new. the polling place is here, we hope you vote democratic. they knew every new person in the neighborhood. nate silver's predictions, a new ball game in terms of how we predict, how accurate the prediction may be. his work phenomenally so this time >> 50 for 50 on this day call. >> most expensive super pacs, the role of money. are we really going to continue letting that happen? it is amazing. my review of -- my view of record early voting, a nother change from the pastorate in may be very helpful in the state's likely to have bad weather. my take on the house divided statement was i cannot think it is democrat versus republican. i think the republicans have factored the party and they have to figure out who they are the tea party years -- partie
and really not about race or religion. and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at our society, net and don't necessarily fully understand it. >> i'm a sponsor with northrop-grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria, to go back to syria, when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i don't see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle middle east, something like 20 to 30%. [inaudible] >> my figures are dated. anyway i am curious, if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out? thank you. >> john -- jen'nan. >> we aren't hearing a lot about the difference between the muslims and christians because it's not an overarching and pressing problem in syria and getting back to comment earlier about the rest of the region, my half brother who was with the libyan rebels against gadhafi, they are now all trying to help the turks get assad out so getting back to marc's comment, we have gone a long way to at least getting some of the res
, and voluntary organizations to do society's work. they made the federal government neutral on religion. states could have an established religion, or they did not have to have won. we were going to leave religion -- the federal government was going to be neutral on that. that mostly worked, although there were difficulties. we had something called the civil war because he suddenly got a federal government issue, slavery and the territories -- congress was given specific power to regulate the territories are you could not avoid that issue. we had civil war. one of the problems with big government in my judgment is that when you have something like obamacare, it suddenly becomes a federal issue whether or not your insurance policy should cover the $9 a month you need to pay for contraceptive is at walmart. that is less than the price of two pumpkin lattes at starbucks. it became a national issue when we had a speaker on the prime- time tv our of the democratic convention abdicating her position. a lot of people have strong views based on their personal moral beliefs are there religious beliefs o
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)